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TSS
The Speech Source, Inc.
P.O. Box 170488
Milwaukee, WI
53217-8041


Toll Free:
(888) 811-3497
Phone:
(414) 964-3497
TTY:
(414) 964-5897
Email:
[email protected]




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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)



About TSS - The Speech Source, Inc.
Where is TSS located?
Who owns TSS?

About Sign Language Interpreting
How far in advance do I need to request an interpreter?
What information do I need to give when requesting service?
What happens if I arrange for an interpreter and then don't need one?
Why is a team of interpreters sometimes needed?
What does "certified interpreter" mean?

About Spoken Language Interpreting
How far ahead of time do I need to call for an interpreter?
What information do I need to give when requesting service?
What happens if I arrange for an interpreter and then don't need one?
Do interpreters also translate documents?
Is an interpreter required if a friend, relative, or neighbor is willing to interpret?

About CART Real-Time Stenocaptioning
What is CART?
Is CART captioning like TV captioning?
Who can benefit from CART?
Is CART different from other speech-to-text systems?
How do I know if CART or sign language interpreting is the right choice?
Is CART more expensive than sign language interpreting?
What equipment is needed for CART?
Why is a team of stenocaptioners sometimes required?
How far ahead do I need to request a CART stenocaptioner?
What information do I need to give when requesting a CART stenocaptioner?
What happens if I request a CART stenocaptioner and then find I don't need one?
Does the stenocaptioner provide a transcript?
What is Captioned Theater?

About Speech Therapy
Is a speech therapist the same as a speech-language pathologist?
How do I know if my child's speech and language skills are age-appropriate?
Can stuttering problems be prevented?
Can stuttering problems be cured?
What is a parent's role in stuttering therapy?
How can I tell whether a therapist will help?
Am I too old for stuttering therapy?
Is individual or group therapy more effective?
Are there live groups or on-line chat rooms for children and adults with stuttering problems?
Will insurance pay for stuttering therapy?
What is accent modification instruction?
Is it possible to arrange for a presentation to my school, business, or organization?

About T.S.S. - The Speech Source, Inc.

Q. Where is TSS located?


A.TSS is based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Our staff live in various locations throughout the State of Wisconsin, although most reside in Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee, and Dane counties. We provide state-wide service.



Q. Who owns TSS?


A.Speech Therapist, Ellen-Marie Silverman, owns and manages the company. TSS is a closely-held corporation. It was incorporated in the State of Wisconsin in 1995.



About Sign Language Interpreting

Q.How far in advance do I need to request an interpreter?


A.As soon as you know you will need an interpreter, contact us. The more time we have to find an interpreter to meet your needs, the more likely we will be successful doing so. We typically schedule 1-2 months out, but we always accept last minute requests.



Q.What information do I need to give when requesting service?


A.We will need: The date and time of the assignment; the location, including telephone number and the name of the on-site contact person; a full description of the event; the name of the end-user and the end-user's language preference; and the complete billing address.



Q.What happens if I arrange for an interpreter and then don't need one?

A.If you realize you won't need the services of an interpreter we have scheduled for you, let us know. If you notify us that you need to cancel a request two full business days prior to the scheduled appointment, there is no charge to you. Otherwise, we do charge a cancellation fee.


Q.Why is a team of interpreters sometimes needed?


A.Interpreters are subject to repetitive motion injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. Depending on the length and nature of an assignment, a team of at least two interpreters may be required. We will work with you to decide the appropriate number of interpreters for your request.



Q.What does "certified interpreter" mean?


A.A certified interpreter is one who has been found to possess a certain level of skill and knowledge by one of two nationally recognized certifying systems in the United States - The Registry for the Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) and The National Association of the Deaf (NAD). Currently, slightly more than 75% of TSS's staff are nationally certified. The remainder have had their skills and knowledge verified by the State of Wisconsin's assessment protocol (WITA) and have earned top scores of "1" and/or "2." TSS screens all staff to ensure they are experienced, caring, skillful communicators. And all staff abide by the RID Code of Ethics and participate in continuing education activities to continually improve their skills and knowledge base.



About Spoken Language Interpreting

Q.How far ahead of time do I need to call for an interpreter?


A.As soon as you know you will need an interpreter, contact us. The more time we have to find an interpreter to meet your needs, the more likely we will be successful doing so. We typically schedule 1-2 months out, but we always accept last minute requests.



Q.What information do I need to give when requesting service?


A.We will need: The date and time of the assignment; the location, including telephone number and the name of the on-site contact person; a full description of the event; the name of the end-user and the end-user's language preference; and the complete billing address.



Q.What happens if I arrange for an interpreter and then don't need one?

A.If you realize you won't need the services of an interpreter we have scheduled for you, let us know. If you notify us that you need to cancel a request two full business days prior to the scheduled appointment, there is no charge to you. Otherwise, we do charge a cancellation fee.



Q.Do interpreters also translate documents?


A.TSS provides document translation, including transalting of web pages. Please contact the office with your request.



Q.Is an interpreter required if a friend, relative, or neighbor is willing to interpret?

A.Yes. The purpose of an interpreter is to help provide complete access in a medical, legal, or other setting for an individual with limited English proficiency (LEP). This means the individual with LEP needs to feel free to communicate without fear of retaliation of any kind. The presence of a friend, relative, or neighbor may inhibit the individual with LEP. Furthermore, untrained individuals may advise or counsel the individual as to what to say or even speak for the individual instead of interpreting for the individual. The only way to ensure an individual is fully informed and heard is to utilize a professional interpreter.



About CART Real-Time Stenocaptioning

Q.What is CART?


A.CART is an acronym. It stands for "communication access real-time translation". CART is provided by nationally certified court reporters who use equipment to present speech as readable text for individuals and groups.



Q.Is CART captioning like TV captioning?


A.TV captioning usually places one to three lines of script on the screen. CART captioning fills the visual display (i.e., notebook screen, computer monitor or monitors, TV or multiple TV's, etc.) with multiple lines of text adjusted to provide maximum readability for both individuals and groups. CART is open captioning. TV captioning is an example of closed captioning. Open captioning is available to all. Closed captioning requires special decoders to make the captioning visible. CART is live. TV captioning may be live or scripted.



Q.Who can benefit from CART?


A.People who have been deaf since childhood, late deafened adults, and hard of hearing people who understand written English can benefit from the service. So, too, can individuals with certain learning problems and people learning English as a second language, who find it easier to read than cope with the variety of speaking styles and dialects of American English. Furthermore, conference and workshop attendees often troubled by poor room acoustics and limited visibility of the speakers can retrieve more information and more accurate information by viewing presentations as text displayed on video monitors placed throughout the conference room.



Q.Is CART different from other speech-to-text systems?


A.Yes. CART is provided by court reporters certified by the National Court Reporters' Association. They are fast, up to 250 words per minute, and accurate, approximately 98% accurate, and are able to provide a verbatim transcript. Other speech-to-text systems, such as C-Print and Typewell, are basically note-taking services. Individuals who provide those services currently do not meet any minimum standard of speed and accuracy. All speech-to-text systems are able to save transcripts to a floppy disk, or other data storage system. And all are able to provide service for individuals, small, and large groups. CART may be slightly more expensive than other speech-to-text systems.



Q.How do I know if CART or sign language interpreting is the right choice?

A.Consumer preference is the ultimate decision-maker. Late deafened adults and hard of hearing individuals who may not be fluent in sign language would probably choose CART. Deaf individuals who can readily comprehend written language may choose CART in some setting and prefer sign language interpreting in others. It is important to ask the consumer their preference.



Q.Is CART more expensive than sign language interpreting?


A.At TSS, we want consumers to have real choices so we have adopted a pricing policy that places the cost of CART comparable to that of sign language interpreting, although CART is slightly more expensive. Please contact the office for details.



Q.What equipment is needed for CART?


A.TSS's stenocaptioners bring a stenomachine, notebook computer, real-time captioning software, cables, and other accessory connection equipment to each assignment. When the consumer is an individual, the notebook computer is used for the visual display. For groups, when a TV monitor, multiple TV monitors, or multiple computer monitors may be the display units of choice, we recommend that the purchaser provide the display units to reduce the cost of the service.



Q.Why is a team of stenocaptioners sometimes required?


A.When an assignment exceeds three hours, we send a team of two stenocaptioners to ensure accuracy of service and reduce the likelihood of repetitive motion impairments for the stenocaptioners. We will work with you to determine the appropriate number of stenocaptioners for your needs. Please contact the office for more information.



Q.How far ahead do I need to request a CART stenocaptioner?


A.As soon as you know you will need CART, contact us. The more advance time we have, the more likely we will be successful meeting your needs. We typically schedule 1-2 months out, but we always accept last minute requests.



Q.What information do I need to give when requesting a CART stenocaptioner?

A.We will need: The date and time of the assignment; the location, including telephone number and the name of the on-site contact person; a full description of the event; the name of the end-user and the end-user's reason for requesting CART; and the complete billing address. In addition, we will need to know the names of individuals who will be speakers and special terms or acronyms that may be used during the presentations. This information is used for pre-event dictionary preparation to ensure the highest accuracy of captioning.



Q.What happens if I request a CART stenocaptioner and then find I don't need one?

A.If you realize you won't need the services of the stenocaptioner we have scheduled for you, let us know. If notify us that you need to cancel a request two full business days prior to the scheduled appointment, there is no charge to you. Otherwise, we do charge a cancellation fee.



Q.Does the stenocaptioner provide a transcript?


A.TSS provides complete transcripts for an extra charge to cover the cost of final editing and formatting the text and, when necessary, postage and handling. But it is not necessary to purchase a transcript. Please contact the office for details.



Q.What is Captioned Theater?


A.TSS pioneered "Live Captioned Theater" (U.S. patent pending) to provide the deaf patron, the patron who is hard of hearing, and the patron learning English as a second language an opportunity to see the words delivered by the actor as text almost as soon as the actor says them. This application of technology provides access to live theater for those with impaired hearing and other needs that make it desirable to receive speech as text . Captioned Theater display methods do vary. TSS's "Live Captioned Theater" (U.S. patent pending) utilizes a large screen display unit close to the stage. We can tell you more about this exciting adaptation of technology to live performing arts and entertainment! Please contact our office for more information.



About Speech Therapy

Q.Is a speech therapist the same as a speech-language pathologist?

A."Speech therapist" and "speech-language pathologist" are two different names for the same service provider. TSS prefers to refer to our staff as speech therapists because we feel the label therapist most accurately describes the vision and service we provide. TSS's speech therapists have earned the Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and are licensed to practice in the State of Wisconsin.



Q.How do I know if my child's speech and language skills are age-appropriate?

A.If you wonder whether your child understands spoken language and speaks as well as others the same age, you should contact a specialist. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) website includes a list of specialists in your area who can help answer your questions.



Q.Can stuttering problems be prevented?


A.Some experts believe stuttering problems are learned. They probably would answer "Yes." Others believe stuttering problems arise from neurological triggers. They probably would answer "No." Each child follows an individual path when learning speech and language. For some, noticeable hesitancy occurs at the time spoken sentence construction emerges and at other times later on. This does not mean a stuttering problem may be emerging. What it means is that the child is somewhat hesitant trying to decide what to say, how to say it, and to whom to say it. The Stuttering Foundation of America offers information to parents about how to respond to their children during episodes of stuttering, or disfluency. So, too, can local speech therapists provide information and guidance at these times. The way parents respond to their children's stuttering episodes, including seeking professional assistance, can help prevent the likelihood of a stuttering problem occurring.



Q.Can stuttering problems be cured?


A.Adults and children who have stuttering problems can learn to speak more fluently; to manage their lives so as to reduce factors such as fatigue, which may trigger stuttering; and to respond to fluency lapses in a way that strengthens their self-concepts. Learning to manage their stuttering by what they think and do gives people freedom from the feelings of victimization that are commonplace with individuals who haven't accomplished this. Adopting mental constructs and behaviors enhancing interpersonal communication and socialization is, indeed, a form of "cure." The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and The Stuttering Foundation of America make available lists of speech therapists interested in working with people with stuttering problems.



Q.What is a parent's role in stuttering therapy?


A.The parents, the therapist, and, depending on age and other factors, the child need to discuss how the parents may contribute effectively to the therapy process. This will differ from family to family and from point in therapy to point in therapy. Being in communication with the therapist throughout the therapy experience helps. And the way to do that needs to be discussed at the outset and periodically during the therapy program.



Q.How can I tell whether a therapist will help?


A.The therapist will say at the outset, usually following the evaluation that may precede therapy, whether or not she or he feels able to help and what that help may be. Considering the recommendation carefully in light of your goals and expectations and how you feel about working closely with the therapist, you will be able to decide if this therapist can help you. If you decide not, maybe another can. If you are truly motivated to change, seek a therapist with whom you feel comfortable working. The therapist, though, can only guide you. The person desiring change is the one who works to bring it about.



Q.Am I too old for stuttering therapy?


A.Anyone with a distinct personal goal who is willing to consistently undertake the procedures required to bring about that change has the potential to benefit from treatment. In general, the longer cognitive and behavioral patterns have persisted, the more difficult they are to alter, but that doesn't mean they can't be. And, sometimes, older individuals have greater motivation to carry them through daily practice routines. This question can be answered best in consultation with a therapist.



Q.Is individual or group therapy more effective?


A.Your therapist can best explain why individual or group treatment may work best for you at a certain point in your therapy program. You, of course, must make the final decision, as is true throughout therapy. Keep in mind what about yourself you wish to change. Then think carefully how you are most likely to do that in a way to encourage lasting change. Choosing individual treatment doesn't mean you have forfeited the opportunity to talk with others with stuttering problems. In some locations, groups of people with stuttering problems meet to talk with one another. And there are chat rooms on the internet for those with stuttering problems. The Stuttering Home Page is a good place to begin to identify such opportunities.



Q.Are there live groups or on-line chat rooms for children and adults with stuttering problems?

A.Yes. There is the possibility for sharing in local, regional, and national groups and via the internet. A good place to start locating such opportunities is at Stuttering Home Page.



Q.Will insurance pay for stuttering therapy?


A.To learn the answer to this question, you will need to contact your insurance company.



Q.What is accent modification instruction?


A.Typically, in the United States, accent modification instruction allows people learning English as a second language to sound more like native speakers of American English. This is done by learning to use the sounds of American English as native speakers do and by adopting a melody pattern and speaking rate that corresponds to that of the local English-speaking community. The instruction may be individual or group-based. It is provided by speech therapists.



Q.Is it possible to arrange for a presentation to my school, business, or organization?

A. Yes. We will be pleased to talk with your group. Depending on the topic selected, there may or may not be a charge. Please contact the office for more information.




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